Proven Ways to Survive Your First Year of Marriage

The honeymoon stage, marital bliss, and newlyweds are all words to describe you and your first year of marriage. While the phrase conjures up images of simplicity, passion and possibly choirs singing in the background, the truth about the first year of marriage comes as quite a shock to many “lovebirds.” According to information collected, the median age of a woman at their first divorce is 29, for men it is 30.5. The Bureau reports that the average number of years a marriage lasts is 7.8.

This by no means is intended to suggest that your marriage is doomed. But, many couples are not prepared for what is in store for them. When people are young, they have the illusion that the love they share with their husband or wife is stronger than the love of couples who have come before them. But, regardless of how secure you feel your love is, marriage still takes work. For women, it is critical to keep your figures. If you have not tried yoga, we encourage you to take a look at this weight loss yoga for beginners at home link. You can thank us later.

Here are some Ways to Survive Your First Year of Marriage

Expect change: Natural changes always happen in any relationship. It is just a matter of being prepared for them. For example, if you have never lived with your spouse before being married, then you might discover new things about him that you are unaccustomed to. Does he leave clothes on the floor, or dishes in the sink? These are just small nuisances to expect. But these minor annoyances can be dealt with quickly as long as you make an effort to bring them up in a calm and noncritical way.

There may also be emotional changes as well. You are no longer in courting stage of your relationship; you may find that your partner is less vocal about his admiration for you. It doesn’t mean that he loves you any less, but perhaps he expects that you know already how much he cares for you. Often couples in counseling discuss their love languages to discover the many ways that they both express love, and how they prefer to receive love.

Work on communication skills: It is stressed to couples that communication is key to creating a healthy marriage. But, communication is about more than expressing all of your feelings. You should also work on your communication style:

Watch your tone of voice

Make requests, not demands, of your spouse

Don’t make accusations

Use “I” statements to explain how you’re feeling

Don’t hold onto past issues

Nurture your relationship: Many times, couples start to take one another and their union for granted. But, just like any living thing, marriage needs attention and care if it is going to grow. This means taking the time to talk with your spouse about areas of the relationship you aren’t pleased with and making an effort toward improvements. To strengthen the nurturing aspect of their marriage, this is the point where many couples turn to counseling.

Keep up date nights: Yes, you both sat on the couch and watched the 11 o’clock news together last night, but that does not qualify as a date. Neither does the car ride you took to the home improvement store last weekend. Just because you don’t feel the constant need to impress one another anymore, and you likely see each other every day, doesn’t mean you don’t need a night out once in a while. Some of the longest lasting couples still schedule time alone. The responsibility of preparing for the date can be alternated. This week look around for things your spouse likes, maybe tickets to see a particular sports team, or to the movie in the theater that has their favorite actor in it, and surprise him. Then, the next week, it is his turn to surprise you. The constant exchange will help add excitement to the week and offers another way to show your appreciation for one another.